Recent Articles:

TSR Transition

December 19, 2012 Issue One, Volume Four No Comments

By The Sustainability Review

A short video about TSR’s transition to the SciVO (science video online) format.

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SciVO Script Submission

December 19, 2012 Issue One, Volume Four No Comments

By The Sustainability Review

A video introduction to TSR’s new submission process.
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SciVO Generic Storyboard

December 20, 2012 Issue One, Volume Four No Comments

By The Sustainability Review

Some ways to think about crafting a script for your SciVO.

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The Interactive Atlas of the San Miguel

By Dan Collins and Gene Cooper

The Interactive Atlas of the San Miguel is a mediated sculptural display that allows users to interact with informational layers (pictures, texts, maps, stream data, etc.) and contribute “stories of place” focused on the San Miguel River Watershed in Southwestern Colorado. The project in its current form is a prototype for a network of interactive stations situated in publically accessible institutions and facilities (libraries, schools, museums, general stores, etc.) along the length of the San Miguel River. … Continue Reading

Innovation and the Future of Urbanization: A TSR interview with Dr. Karen Seto (Part Two)

By Branden Boyer-White and Michael Bernstein

As you may have read, we at The Sustainability Review recently had the good fortune of speaking with Dr. Karen Seto, Associate Professor of the Urban Environment at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental studies, on her research related to urbanization in China and India. In our first piece, we discussed the implications, drivers and challenges of global scale urbanization in China and India. In this edited portion of our conversation, we look to the future and discuss the obstacles to and opportunities for urban sustainability. … Continue Reading

Heritageisation of the Sun Corridor: A Heritage Tourism Perspective

By Deepak Chhabra, PhD

The Sun Corridor, as the “New Heartland” of Arizona, has gathered unprecedented momentum in recent decades. It is one of ten megapolitan regions in the country and encompasses a total of four metropolitan areas in Arizona: Phoenix, Tucson, Prescott and Nogales. The primary purpose of the development of this corridor has been to link together cities, towns, villages and counties based on “goods movement, business linkages, cultural commonality and physical environments” (1). Several reports observe growth, recent trends and emerging industries in the region. However, a micro-level blueprint for a synergistic corridor product that can strongly tie the metropolitan areas together in a multi-sector, unified approach and provide opportunities and prosperity to the region and overall state is still lacking. … Continue Reading

Challenges and Dynamics of Urbanization: A TSR interview with Dr. Karen Seto (Part One)

By Michael Bernstein and Branden Boyer-White

Dear lucky readers: we at The Sustainability Review recently had the good fortune of speaking with Dr. Karen Seto, Associate Professor of the Urban Environment at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental studies, on her research related to urbanization in China and India. According to her official bio, Dr. Seto’s research focuses on four themes touching on human land-use transformation: its nature, impacts, implications, and potential future manifestations. In this first part of our edited transcript, we discuss aspects and drivers of urbanization in China and India. In the second part (forthcoming in Features), we look to the future and discuss challenges and opportunities for urban sustainability. … Continue Reading

Walking “the tightrope of existence”: E. O. Wilson’s Philosophy Comes to Life in the “Anthill Chronicles”

By Kaitlin Gowan

Anthill, renowned biologist and environmentalist E.O. Wilson’s first novel, follows Raphael Semmes Cody through a childhood mesmerized by the wonders of the Nokobee Tract and Dead Owl Cove to an adult life devoted to preserving the natural environment. … Continue Reading

Behavioral Economics and Corporate Sustainability

By John Byrd, PhD and Kent Hickman, PhD

The likelihood of meaningful legislation supporting a shift towards more sustainable practices by business and individuals seems miniscule. Without government policies or incentives the move to sustainability depends largely on the voluntary actions of companies. Companies choose the types of products they produce–the materials they are made of, their recyclability, their energy consumption, their durability–and how the products are manufactured–production efficiency, working conditions and so on. In theory individuals, through their consumption choices, can send a message to companies about the types of products they want. But if the range of choices doesn’t include price competitive green alternatives this message never gets back to corporate decision makers. … Continue Reading

The Covert Power of Creativity

By Alyce Santoro

Because conceptual art can exist in non-material forms, one could argue that it is not only one of the most sustainable forms of creative practice, but also one of the most radical in its potential to challenge conventional thinking. To a tremendous extent, commercial media—whose primary function is to persuade its audience to consume—influences current prevailing thought. Conceptual art, by contrast, is often non-commodifiable; the value of an idea can supersede conventional methods of quantification, lending it a subtle, subversive, status-quo-defying kind of power. … Continue Reading