Letter from the Editor

Dear Readers, Welcome to the first issue of The Sustainability Review, an online, biannual publication hosting art, opinion and research contributions.  TSR is associated with Arizona State University’s School of Sustainability, but is open to participation and contribution from people across and outside of academia.  TSR has two overarching goals: to communicate the concepts, challenges and approaches of sustainability, sustainability science and sustainable thinking, and to engage people from all fields in discussions about sustainability topics through accessible and interesting writing and other communication forms, such as photography.  At the very least, the editors of this inaugural issue hope to contribute to and help shape sustainability discussions.

TSR publishes contributions explaining complex concepts and issues in an accessible and engaging way.  It also seeks to involve people who might be shut out from typical sustainability discourse, particularly in academic settings.  TSR provides a forum for a spectrum of views on sustainability - from sustainable enterprise to community building and environmental justice concerns. The first issue includes research, essays and art pieces demonstrating a wide range of sustainability thought.  It includes perspectives on academic innovation with ASU leading the way from ASU President Michael Crow (American Research Universities Must Lead Our Emergence From the Stone Age), PepsiCo's water conservation and waste management initiatives in India (Environmental Management of Multinational Corporations in India: The Case of PepsiCo), and various consumption practices and consequences (Rio Salado Walk; Consuming the Land; Commingled Sorting Facility; Too Much of a Good Thing: The Relationship Between Money and Happiness in a Post-Industrial Society).  It highlights questions such as, How do we measure the value of different species and ecosystems (The Services of the Praying Mantis)?  What does building knowledge for sustainability mean in the context of higher learning institutions (Students’ Perspective on Building Knowledge for Sustainability)?

The TSR editors recognize that professionals, policymakers, activists and the general public do not generally read peer-reviewed scientific journals, but this is precisely the audience that needs to be reached in order to move towards sustainable societies. Hopefully, TSR will contribute to a more scientifically literate and socially and environmentally responsible public, and possibly even spur some well-informed individuals to advance societal changes.

People often remark that it is peculiar that the School of Sustainability is located in a sprawling desert metropolis.  Isn’t it absurd, they ask, to focus on sustainability in a place that requires enormous amounts of resources and effort to exist? Indeed, like so many places in this world, the Phoenix metro area’s current structure is, in many ways, antithetical to sustainable lifestyles: the Valley of the Sun's resource constraints and vulnerabilities just happen to be all the more palpable.  This is, then, an important place to learn, discuss, and start making real changes towards sustainability.

Maren Mahoney

Editor-in-Chief

Editors for the Spring 2010 issue:

Sandra Rodegher, Arts Editor

Haley Paul, Opinion Editor

Robert Horner, Research Editor

RJ Meyers, Web Editor

Faculty adviser: Dr. Dan Childers

Acknowledgments:

The list of people to thank is long and likely incomplete.  The collaborative nature of this publication process, however, exemplifies the transdisciplinary effort required to create such a publication.  The list is alphabetized because everyone’s assistance was crucial to TSR’s creation.

We would like to give extra special thanks to the people who helped with the web publishing process.  Teresa Aguilera, a professional graphic designer, and Evan Taylor, an IT professional and SOS undergraduate, both provided extensive, pro bono help.  We would also like to give a special thanks to the School of Sustainability communication office, particularly Karen Leland, Vince Palermo and Bryan Barker.

Thank you:

Teresa Aguilera

Braden Allenby

Andrea Baty

Bryan Barker

Dr. Christopher Boone

Edgar Cardenas

Dr. Dan Childers

Dr. Michael M. Crow

Laura Digan

Dr. Hallie Eakin

Ben Funke

Zachary Hughes

David Iwaniec

Dr. Susan Ledlow

Karen Leland

Leonard Machler

Liz Marquez

Thad Miller

Lisa Murphy

Vincent Palermo

Dr. Charles Redman

Susan Schmidt

Evan Taylor

Dr. Arnim Wiek

Also, special thanks to our contributors:

Jeffrey Ackley

Julie Anand, MFA

Kristen Faye Bean, MSW

Gaea Bailey

Manjyot Bhan

Kyle Boggs

Dr. Michael Crow

Heather Findling

Justin Freiberg

Neal Humphrey

Ben Miller

Thaddeus R. Miller

Tischa A. Muñoz-Erickson

Bradford Pete-Hill

John M. Quick

Alison Dalton Smith

Lauren Strohacker

Adam Thorman

Ben Warner

The Kerala Model of Development: A Path to Sustainability

Material Histories: Rio Salado Habitat Restoration Area, 16th Street [1/4 square mile] Phoenix, Arizona + Brush Creek Road [2 miles] Snowmass Village, Colorado