The Urban Foodshed Collaborative

Greenwood lot The Urban Foodshed Collaborative provides a space and structure for New Haven youth to connect to the potential of the land around them. The youth grow food as well as their entrepreneurial abilities, and through this process, UFC grows young leaders. We aim to turn conceptions on their head. We create opportunity where others saw vacant lots. All through collaboration.

UFC braids together a number of trends that allow it to succeed: the need for New Haven youth to have valuable, building experiences that pay a deserved wage, the desire of restaurants and markets to source locally-grown, culturally-relevant produce, and the city of New Haven’s aim to turn vacant lots into green, productive space. To watch the video, click below:

The Urban Foodshed Collaborative

Divinity harvest

Contributor's Biography:

Justin Freiberg is passionate about sharing the transformative act of growing food with youth. This past summer, he founded and ran the Urban Foodshed Collaborative in New Haven, which seeks to reinvent vacant urban spaces through the insight and efforts of local youth – growing food for local markets and restaurants while providing green space for communities – all documented on film. Justin is also currently a student at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, and recently finished up a Certificate in Conservation Biology from Columbia University, and has worked with the Wildlife Conservation Society, Added Value, and Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture. He holds Masters and Bachelor degrees in psychology from Wesleyan University, and is aiming to integrate social science techniques with agricultural development work. He's also working on a documentary about foraging for food, which is perhaps his favorite thing to do – in the country and the city alike. Making new things out of old things – that’s where it’s at.

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